Tag Archives: Compassion

Khenchen Konchog Gyaltshen Rinpoche – Jewel Ornament of Liberation – Chapter 11: Training in Action bodhichitta

One takes the vow of action bodhichitta, and train in the three types of moral conduct, or three moral trainings. These are moral ethics of abstaining from non-virtues, [engaging in] ethics of accumulating wisdom, and [engaging in] ethics of benefiting sentient beings.

“Generosity, moral ethics, and patience are the trainings in superior morality. Meditative concentration is the training in superior thought. Discriminating wisdom awareness is the training in superior wisdom. Perseverance is the support for all three.”

You need joyous effort. This is how the six paramitas work with the three trainings. The three trainings are the impeccable, indispensable, consummate path to enlightenment.

When you meditate here, relax. You need the conducts. [When you are] physically here, and mentally have a mind absent of afflictive emotions, this is called moral conduct.  That makes a foundation for concentration. Then your mind is in the place you are.  When mind is not disturbed by capricious thoughts, there is clarity. Where there is clarity, there is a great chance to see special insight. If there is the absence of one, there is no chance to recapture the reality nature. Continue reading

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Nuba Rinpoche – 2 day bodhichitta vow, part 2- TMC Frederick – 6/6/11

(Part 1)

I am crying with joy that I am able to give this great bodhichitta generation in the traditional way. 

You are all very fortunate to receive this.

Originally, I was going to do it simplified. But then I thought, after the past week of teachings on the Uttaratantra Shastra, when you have been listening so intently, I should do the traditional way. Also, this center is one of the oldest in this country, and there is much blessings in this month, according to the Tibetan Lunar calendar.

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Khenpo Tsultrim Tenzin Rinpoche- TMC Frederick – Lojong (Mind Training) December 27, 2011

(Continued from December 26)

Making Adversity the Path of Awakening (continued)

Yesterday, we did “making adversity the path of awakening.” So there, environmentally, facing all kinds of difficulties– emotionally, defilements are increasing. So for those reasons sometimes, world is full of misfortune. In Buddhism, we talk about the relationship between the outer environment and the inner mental state. So when the mind mental state goes to a more negative way. I think we talk about karma. Sometime people misunderstand.  Mainly, if we come into a lack of fortune of good qualities, then conditions can attack easier. Humans, non-humans, environmentally, attacks happen easily. If our good fortune is strong then other things can’t hurt us much. Sometimes, we think “just practicing this or that deity will solve things.” But we need to create vessel to receive that conditions. So, in the same way, decreasing the degeneration of the mind is needed. Continue reading

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Khenpo Tsultrim Tenzin Rinpoche- TMC Frederick – Lojong (Mind Training) December 26, 27, 2011

Khenpo Tsultrim Tenzin- TMC Frederick – Lojong – December 26, 27, 2011

(Note: This teaching was a commentary on Jamgon Kongtol the Great’s now-classic Lojong text, The Great Path of Awakening. Khenpo Rinpoche read from the book itself (in English) and then expanded on it. The quotes from Jamgon Kongtrol appear below bolded and indented without quote marks. Quotes from other teachers appear with quote marks.)

…Need reasons for bodhichitta.

So, need to meditate on love. There are 2 kinds of love:  one that leads to suffering, and one that is bigger.  (In answer to question) Tonglen will come shortly. (Laughter)   It is part of bodhichitta. But need a purpose first, otherwise, won’t do it.  You can do anything with parents or kids, but not for strangers. Westerns always ask that question – “why?” That’s good.  We have to figure out, what is the purpose for bodhichitta.  You have to love someone who is kind to you.  Before meditating love, you need to see reason to love this one.  The kindness. What kind of kindness?  Generally, Buddhas  say “your mother.”

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Shantideva never sounded like this!, or, Glass Compassion (Movement 8)

As a tie-in with Khandro Rinpoche’s teachings on the Bodhicharyavatara, I thought it would be cool to include Movement Eight of Symphony No. 5: Requiem, Bardo and Nirmanakaya by ‘New York Minimalist Composer Phillip Glass *‘ which draws most of the words of the choral piece from Chapter 3 of Shantideva’s Bodhicharyavatara which Khandro Rinpoche specifically stressed should be brought into the continuum of one’s being.

Mr. Glass also uses words from Chinese philosopher Mencius and from a 1st Century wandering ascetic Rabbi that seem to be conveniently ‘forgotten’ by some of his supposed modern-day followers.


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Khandro Rinpoche 2012 annual retreat – talk 1: part 3:Intro to Patrul Rinpoche practice text based on Shantideva’s Bodhicharyavatara: Devotion and Compassion

(continued from part 2)

Step by step guided meditation on the profound Mahayana text of Bodhicharyavatara by Patrul Rinpoche

The Bodhicharyavatara was taught by Shantideva first. But Patrul Rinpoche is said to have spent 80% of his life teaching this text.  He is regarded as one who lived in accord with the dharma, setting very high example for all the teachers from the later 19th, 20th century who trained in how Patrul Rinpoche taught.  He said “if there is a single text that is the life-force of the dharma, it is the Bodhicharyavatara.” He received it 108 times. He taught it in public gathering more than 100 times, entrusted to them that they needed to have it taught to them 100 times and teach it 100 times before they’d understood.  There was hardly any lineage master not untouched by Patrul Rinpoche. After he died, he had 1000s of disciples, and so forth.  The only things he had when he died was the robes he was wearing, the bowl he ate in, and a copy of the Bodhicharyavatara.  It is very important when we engage in contemplation that we don’t bring the profound teaching down to our level. Continue reading

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Khenchen Konchog Gyaltshen Rinpoche – the Drigung Kagyu Fivefold Path of Mahamudra – Part 1: Love, Compassion and Bodhichitta – TMC May 2012

“First, when the precious bodhichitta, the mind of enlightenment, arises, the activities of body, speck and mind will, like base metal transforming into gold, follow in that direction.”

Cultivate it. Impress the mind with the view of loving-kindness, compassion and bodhicitta.

Like base metal transforming into gold -For example, iron is transformed into gold.  When in the (state without) bodhicitta, our body, speech and mind activities are just ordinary, samsaric, involved in mental afflictions. But when the bodhicitta is infused in you, that very body, speech and mind becomes a part of bodhicitta. (They become) a path to get free from suffering. Continue reading

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Loving-kindness and Compassion – Khenpo Tsultrim Tenzin

Khenpo Tsultrim Tenzin Rinpoche

“9. You need to turn your mind toward helping other beings with loving-kindness and compassion, both directly and indirectly.”  – From  “Ten Necessary Things” section of Gampopa’s  Precious Garland of the Sublime Path.

‘Love’ I’m not sure it actually works. Sanskrit is ‘maitri’. It’s not love, more becoming ‘dear friend,’ ‘friendship’. ‘Love’ has an element of selfishness. We say ‘I love chicken, I love beef, whatever.” (laughs) Maitri is ‘great friendliness.’ This is much better translation than love. Ordinary love has a sense of self-interest.  “I” is always put there, as in “I love them.” So, Maitri is ‘dear friend.’  Loving-kindness and compassion is not (just) towards those who are suffering. Anyone can develop that. Anyone can develop compassion to someone miserable. It is easy. It is difficult to develop to compassion to someone who is making mistakes and enjoying worldly pleasure. There are the three kinds of suffering. We have to base on all three – that is a bodhisattva.  Only those who are miserable? That isn’t it. Anyone can do that. There is no need for bodhisattva effort and motivation (for them).

“You need to turn the mind toward helping other beings with loving-kindness and compassion, both directly and indirectly.” ‘Ninje’ is Tibetan for compassion. ‘nin’ is heart. ‘je’ is bottom. So, it is ‘ From the bottom of the heart’, wanting more things like good things. It’s not just a sense of sympathy.  In this case, basically, in the 4 immeasurables, it is “want to be free from suffering.” What is suffering here? It’s all three sufferings. It’s not just our perspective of suffering, (but) suffering of suffering, suffering of change, and all-pervasive suffering. We know what the suffering of change is. As much as we enjoy it, it will bring suffering. How much we experience pleasure in world, that much it brings pain. I know this myself! (laughs) The suffering of all pervasive is this body is suffering. If you don’t have this body, you aren’t going to experience that suffering.  It’s why Shantideva said, “if someone punches you, you should have anger at both them and this body for hurting you. “All the store of suffering is this body. Because of this body, we experience suffering. So, it is all pervasive suffering.

(excerpt from teaching on Gampopa’s “Precious Garland of the Sublime Path”, May 26, 2012, Tibetan Meditation Center, Frederick, Md.)

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Loving-Kindness – How to do it

(Note: This teaching was condensed from  an email conversation I had explaining how to practice loving-kindness.  I have edited it into this form so that they – and anyone else – can have this as a reference. May it be of benefit. – JTR/LWWD)

There are two of the contemplation exercises that are traditional antidotes to jealousy that I think would appropriate to teach at this point to go with the ‘basic calm abiding’ you have.

I am going to explain loving-kindness first and then rejoicing. These are said to be the most powerful and effective methods for decreasing some of humanities worst traits (without repression of emotions, which only causes harm.)

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His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama – Kalachakra in Washington DC, Summer 2011

…(continuation of instructions on shamatha)

The key is a tight dosage of exertion, not too low or too high. If you learn to habituate your mind, in a few months, you can see results in keeping mind on object of meditation.

At first, you will be able to keep your focus for only for 1 or 2 minutes, then 10-20 minutes. Then, in a meditation session, the majority of the time you can keep the mind focused.  Be more cautious of laxity.

Insight meditation is common to Buddhists and some non-Buddhists. What is unique to Buddhists is the context – the no-self.          We take selflessness as object meditation after shamatha.  There are differences in the mode of practice. Discursive analysis is the key to special insight.

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